Huber Riesling

Maker: Markus Huber, Reichersdorf, Traisental, Austria

Grape: Riesling

Region: Traisental DAC, Austria

Vinatge: 2008

Style: Dry

ABV: 12%

Appearance: Light gold

Nose: Dry and flinty, a bit of peach and woodruff.

On the palate: Minerals on entry, then a bit of underripe peach. Total absence of any citrus notes.

Finish: Clean and dry with a light, mineral bitterness that lingers for a long time.

Parting Words: I’ve been a Riesling fan for a long time and this is one of the driest ones I’ve ever tasted. That’s not a bad thing either. It epitomizes the Austrian style of white wines and showcases the versatility of Riesling itself. As Austrian whites become easier to find and more popular in the U.S., the gauntlet has been thrown down. North American winemakers are the best in the world. I would love to taste a Michigan, New York, or Washington dry Riesling. Get at it folks! Huber Riesling is recommended.

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4 thoughts on “Huber Riesling

  1. I know that New York and Michigan DO make dry Rieslings, obviously. But I have never tasted something that dry from North America. That is the gauntlet that has been thrown down.

  2. Various Alsatian or Domestic Riesling may be technically “dry,” meaning lack of any residual sugar, but may be creamier or weightier than counterparts from Austria or Australia.

    Austria is an amazing location for some of the most lazer-sharp and piercing Rieslings in the world.

  3. That’s a good question. Fermenting all the way dry certainly helps, but the grapes have to be grown in a proper region, such as Eden and Clare from Australia, Nahe or Mosel in Germany, or Wachau/Kremstal/Kamptal in Austria. These areas tend to be hillside, they stress the grapes, and lend to that style. Certainly the soils in these ares are poor and rocky.

    Sometimes you’ll get it from certain hillside California and Washington producers, but it’s quite rare. Unfortunately, the vineyards that can make that type of Riesling in the US are planted to Cabernet or other more “fashionable” grapes.

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