A Visit to Castle & Key: A Photo Essay, pt 2

Last week, I posted part 1 of my photos of the Castle & Key distillery, FKA The Old Taylor Distillery. The photos were of the World’s Longest Rickhouse and some other buildings on the site that were not yet restored. This week, the photos will be of the distillery itself (and associated buildings), the springhouse and the the dam.

For further reading on this building and Castle & Key check out what friend-of-the-blog Chuck Cowdery has had to say about Old Taylor/Castle & Key here, and posts on Old Taylor’s sister distillery, Old Crow here and here.

Other friend-of-the-blog Fred Minnick takes better pictures than I do. He’s been to OT/C&K several times. Here’s his visits from 2015,  and 2013, just before the current owners purchased the property.

Also check out the Lipmans’ piece about Old Taylor and Old Crow from 1999 (with a 2015 update).

Without further ado…

 

20170429_121841
The iconic springhouse. 
20170429_121324
Columns holding up the springhouse roof. All of the springhouse is original, except for that roof, which has been replaced.
20170429_120856
The iconic view of the iconic key hole shaped springhouse. The pool is ten feet deep. The water looks murky but is perfectly clear when drawn out. Minimal filtration is needed for use. The water is high in calcium and magnesium. The benches now placed around the pool were found inside it!
20170429_121344
The top of the key with the new roof visable. The springhouse is popular for wedding, prom and other photos.
20170429_121807
The well house between the springhouse and the dam on Glenn’s Creek.

I took a short video of the dam and the well house too.

20170429_121929
Entering the boiler building.
20170429_122405
New skylight in boiler building, to eventually become a visitor’s center. The roof was repaired with materials recovered from other buildings on the campus.
20170429_122009
Where the boilers was.
20170429_122530
The front entrance to the distillery building, aka the castle.
20170429_122621
The tower by the main gate, for defensive purposes, obviously.
20170429_122609
The front door.
20170429_123225
Original hardwood floor inside the entrance.
20170429_123400
Fermentation room. White corn is used for the bourbon.
20170429_123254
Heating coils inside the fermenter.
20170429_123604
The still column behind our guide. They’re distilling a lot already about 20 barrels worth a day. They have capacity to go up to 60 a day. They’re doing a lot of contract distilling too. According to our guide, 70% of their output is contract, 30% for themselves. He said it was “no secrets” contract distilling, at least on their end.
20170429_123538
The pot still, thumper, doubler, whatever it’s called. The second part of the still. Their bourbon enters the barrel at 107 proof, rye at 118 proof. I should have mentioned it earlier but they will be using barrels from the Speyside Cooperage in Jackson, Ohio. They swear by them. Laser cut, never leak, apparently. They use numbers 3 and 4 char.
20170429_125716
Distillery building on the right, on the left is the building that was the lab, now serves as an office (upstairs) for Master Distiller Marianne Barnes and a bride’s room (downstairs).
20170429_124424
Walkways from the distillery building to the old lab.
20170429_124454
Second floor walkway to old lab, with Old Taylor stone.
20170429_124526
Same stone as above, from a different angle. Construction began on the distillery building in 1887 and it took twelve years or so to complete, according to our guide. That stone is visible from the road, but before the restoration, it was overgown with vines. I have a picture of this somewhere, but I haven’t been able to track it down.
20170429_125946
Panoramic photo of the beautifully sunken garden behi
20170429_131058
View from the garden looking back at the castle and the old lab.
20170429_130321
Opposite view with Warehouse E on the left.
20170429_130048
The fish pond at the center of the garden.
20170429_131123
Closer view of the pond. When the sunkern garden was being restored, the pond was called “the snakepit”. It was meant literally.
20170429_122556
View of the old office building across McCracken Pike. The roof has collapsed entirely. Eventually, Castle & Key hopes to restore this building too. Hope you enjoyed the photos! Peace.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s