Peninsula Cellars Late Harvest Riesling, 2016

Maker: Peninsula Cellars, Traverse City, Michigan, USA20190320_195250.jpg

Grape: Riesling (at least 85%)

Place of origin: Hawkeye, Kroupa vineyards, Old Mission Peninsula AVA, Traverse City, Michigan, USA.

Style: Sweet Late Harvest

Vintage: 2016

Notes: 22.3 degrees brix at harvest, 71 grams/liter residual sugar

ABV: 8.5%

Appearance: Pale gold with a few tiny bubbles.

Nose: Ripe peach, honey, lemon curd.

Palate: Full-bodied, sweet and tart. Ripe peach again, Orange Julius, gravel dust.

Finish: Sweet and citrusy.

Parting words: Peninsula Cellars is very good because they get their grapes from very good vineyards, Hawkeye and the family vineyard Kroupa in this case. This Late Harvest Riesling is sweet but not cloying. It has a nice balance of citrus, stone fruit and tropical flavors that can stand alongside most Mosel kabinett or spätlese Rieslings at twice the price. I have four bottles of this wine in my cellar currently and I’m looking forward to trying this wine again at 5, 10, 15 and maybe even 20 y/o if I live that long! Like almost everything Peninsula Cellars does, the 2016 Late Harvest Riesling is highly recommended.

 

Kirkland Irish Whiskey

Distiller: Not disclosed (likely Irish Distillers, Dublin, Ireland [Pernod-Ricard])20190313_214454.jpg

Style: Triple distilled Irish blend

Age: 4 y/o

ABV: 40%

Michigan state minimum: $40/1750 ml (comes out to about $17 for 750 ml)

Appearance: Dark straw.

Nose: Cream soda, dried flowers.

Palate: Mild, but pleasant. Lemon meringue pie, alcohol.

Finish: Vanilla, malt, toffee.

Mixed: I tried Kirkland Irish Whiskey with ginger ale, in a Blackthorn and a Paddy cocktail. I didn’t care much for the Blackthorn, but the other two were very good.

Parting words: Kirkland Irish Whiskey only comes around my local Costco in the month of March, but I wish it was available year round. It’s simple and relatively young, but still elegant. It tastes a little like Jameson, but the floral aromas are balanced with a sweet creaminess that is lacking in the world’s best-selling Irish whiskey. Not much else to say, but I’m enjoying Kirkland a lot more than the last Irish whiskey I bought, which was twice the age, incidentally. Kirkland Irish Whiskey is highly recommended.

 

Head to head: Cognac Park XO vs XO Cigar Blend

Maker: Tessendier et fils, Cognac, Charentes, France20190314_220844.jpg

XO= XO

XO Cigar Blend= XOC

Place of origin

XO: Cognac, France

XOC: Champagne, Cognac, France (“Fine Champagne”)

Age Category: XO (at least 6 y/o, for now)

ABV: 40%

Price (Binny’s)

XO: $90

OXC: $120

Appearance

XO: Burnt orange.

XOC: Lighter, medium copper.

Nose

XO: Dried fig, old oak, black currant jelly.

XOC: Toasted oak, Meyer lemon peel, leather.

Palate

XO: Grape, oak, anise, caramel.

XOC: Vanilla custard, pink peppercorns, salted caramel.

Finish

XO: Big old oak, cruished grapes.

XOC: Lemonheads, light oak, marmalade.

Parting words: This is part two of my three part series on Park Cognacs. Tonight we’re comparing two OX Cognacs, one that’s a standard XO blend and another Fine Champagne blend that was made with cigars in mind.

I don’t enjoy cigars. They smell like burning ass to me. Yes even the good ones. I tried to taste with the smell of fine cigars in mind but it didn’t really help. Compared to the regular XO, the cigar blend tastes thin and overly citric. The XO is pleasantly rich and more rounded. The Cigar Blend is $30 more too. The XO is recommended but the Cigar Blend is not.

 

Michigan Awesome Blueberry Wine

Maker: Michigan Awesome, Holland, Michigan, USA20190306_200601.jpg

Winemaker: Fenn Valley, Fennville, Michigan, USA

Place of origin: True Blue Farms, Grand Junction, Michigan, USA

Style: Semi-sweet blueberry wine

ABV: 12%

Purchased for $11 (winery)

Appearance: Dark burgundy.

Nose: Crushed blueberries, cedar.

Palate: Semi-sweet and tart. Blueberry jam with lemon juice.

Finish: Blueberry pie, wood.

Parting words: Michigan Awesome is a brand of wine, food, apparel, jewelery and just about everything else based in Holland Michigan. It’s all based around Michigan-ness with lots of stuff with the outline of the shape of Michigan on it.

All the Michigan Awesome wines, including their red blend, white blend, cherry wine, and blueberry wine are made by Fenn Valley in Fennville. They’re good winemakers, so I thought Michigan Awesome Blueberry Wine might actually be decent. It is. It’s complex for a blueberry wine, meaning it doesn’t just taste like blueberry juice. It has some nice acid and woodsy notes that make it more enjoyable than most blueberry wines. I’d like it better if it was under $10 but $11 isn’t too bad. Michigan Awesome Blueberry Wine is recommended.

Tommyrotter Triple Barrel American Whiskey

Maker: Tommyrotter Distillery, Buffalo, New York, USA20190222_200053.jpg

Distilleries: Undisclosed distilleries in Indiana and Tennessee (hmm, which ones could they be?)

Style: Wine-barrel finished American whiskey. A mix of two Indiana bourbons and one Tennessee whiskey aged in new and used oak barrels and then the wine barrel, hence Triple Barrel.

Age: NAS

Proof: 90 (45% ABV)

Notes: No coloring or chill filtration added. Sample provided by Tommyrotter Distillery.

Price: $35 (Premier Group).

Appearance: Bright copper.

Nose: Complex. Young toasted oak, tarragon, bubblegum.

Palate: Medium and fruity. Mixed berry jam, French oak, burn.

Finish: Sweet. Corn syrup, raspberry, cocoa powder.

Parting words: Tommyrotter was founded in 2015 by Bobby Finan and Sean Insalaco in Buffalo New York. They currently produce three regular products, vodka, gin, and this Triple Barrel Whiskey plus a line of limited releases (including a bourbon barrel gin to be reviewed in the near future).

Triple Barrel Whiskey is composed of three whiskeys. Two Indiana bourbons (one high-corn, one high-wheat) and one Tennessee whiskey. The high-corn is around 18 months old, the wheater is about 5 years old and the Tennessee 7 y/o. The bourbons are aged in new charred white oak, and the Tennessee Whiskey is aged in used charred oak barrels. They are mixed together and then finished in French red wine barrels. As Bobby Finan told me, Triple Barrel doesn’t count as a blend of straight whiskeys because of the youth of the high-corn bourbon. That could change in the future though.

The result is a delicious, easy-drinking whiskey. It’s young, but the rough edges are smoothed out by judicious use of cooperage. Unfortunately, there wasn’t enough in the sample to do any mixing, but I suspect Triple Barrel would do very well in Manhattans and Old Fashioneds. I’m very glad Bobby reached out to me. Triple Barrel is recommended.