Kilkerran 12 y/o

Distillery: Glengyle, Campbeltown, Argyle & Bute, Scotland, UK (J & A Mitchell)wp-1577138212646.jpg

Style: Single Malt Scotch

Region: Campbeltown

Age: 12 y/o

ABV: 46%

Price: $70 (Binny’s)

Appearance: Medium gold.

Nose: Sweet malt, swimming pool, old oak.

Palate: Full bodied and semi-dry. Butterscotch, oak, burn. Hint of sherry and smoke.

Finish: Malty and chewy.

Parting words: This review was from a 200 ml bottle I purchased at Cadenhead’s in Edinburgh back in July of 2019. I was talked into it by the salesperson, without much resistance on my part. It’s hard to find around here and I do like Springbank so it was an easy choice. I’m glad I made it.

Kilkerran 12 isn’t complex, but it is a well-balanced, enjoyable single malt and it is worth the money. If you can find it, Kilkerran 12 y/o is recommended!

 

 

JK’s Scrumpy Orchard Gate Gold

Maker: Almar Orchards, Flushing, Michigan, USAwp-1577637955256.jpg

Apples: Propietary blend of unspecified organic apples.

Place of origin: Koan Family Orchards, Flushing, Michigan, USA

Style: Semi-dry Farmhouse cider

ABV: 6%

Purchased for $13/4 pint cans

Appearance: Dark gold, slightly hazy. Lightly bubbly.

Nose: Apple juice, caramel, vanilla, butterscotch.

Palate: Tart apple, sweetened apple sauce, touch of tannin.

Finish: Tart and a little sweet.

Parting words: This is the flagship cider of JK’s Scrumpy and the easiest one to find. It’s got big apple flavors, is semi-dry to semi-sweet (depending on who you ask) with no additives, food friendly and accessible to newbies. There’s nothing not to like here unless you’re a dry cider diehard. I would appreciate a little more tannic grip on the back end of the palate and in the finish, but that’s a minor complaint. An excellent example of a middle of the road organic cider, JK’s Scrumpy Orchard Gate Gold is recommended.

Look for more JK’s reviews to come!

 

 

Mackinaw Trail Late Harvest Riesling, 2013

Maker: Mackinaw Trail, Petoskey, Michigan, USAwp-1580342023816.jpg

Grape: Riesling (at least 75%)

Place of origin: Michigan (at least 75%)

Style: Late harvest Riesling

Vintage: 2013

Note: 24 brix at harvest

ABV: 10%

Purchased for $14 (forgotten liquor store)

Appearance: Light gold.

Nose: Peach, pear.

Palate: Medium bodied. Mandarin oranges, ripe peach, gravel.

Finish: Peach then canned pear.

Parting words: This is the first bottle from Mackinaw Trail I have purchased in the last five years at least. Why? Well, several years ago, my friends and I visited the Mackinaw Trail tasting room in Petoskey and had a very pleasant time. Liz and I both liked the Merlot, so we bought a bottle and took it home.

When I opened it a few months later, it tasted terrible and was fizzy. I don’t mean Vinho Verde or Beaujolais Nouveau fizzy, I mean Vernor’s Ginger Ale fizzy. I dumped it out and vowed never to buy another bottle from them. I should have contacted someone, I know, but it was so disgusting that I didn’t want to have anything to do with them again.

A few months ago, I was killing time in a local liquor store and came across this bottle. I love late harvest Riesling (almost any Riesling, really) and this bottle was pretty mature so I thought I’d give Mackinaw Trail another chance. I’m glad I did.

This wine is not complex, and not as good as LHRs produced by some of the larger Michigan wineries like St. Julian, Black Star Farms and Chateau Grand Traverse, but it’s good enough for the price and it held up well for sitting on the shelf of a party store for five years. I’m glad I gave  Mackinaw Trail another try. Makinaw Trail’s 2013 Late Harvest Riesling is recommended.

Old Forester 1910

Maker: Brown-Forman, Louisville, Kentucky, USAwp-1578702014650.jpg

Style: Barrel-finished straight bourbon whiskey.

Age: NAS

Proof: 93 (46.5% ABV)

Michigan State Minimum: $55

Appearance: Chestnut.

Nose: Light oak, ghost pepper, toasted pecan.

Palate: Full-bodied. Brown Sugar and then burn. With water: Pralines, plum, cocoa.

Finish: Long. Maple candy, then alcohol and bubble gum.

Parting words: This is the fourth and final entry in Old Forester’s superb Whiskey Row series of historically inspired bourbons. I’ve liked every single one and I like this one too. The first two, 1870 and 1897, were better (probably older) versions of their two standard expressions the 86 proof and 100 proof (fka Signature) Old Foresters. The third (my favorite) was the 114 proof 1920.

Brown-Forman went in a different direction for 1910, jumping backward ten years to replicate an alleged incident when a fire on the bottling line forced the distillery to store bourbon in a second barrel for some reason. The whole thing sounds a bit dubious to me, but, historicity aside, this is a very good bourbon. The second barrel (new I believe) rounds out OF’s usually sharp edges to give it decadent candy flavors without becoming overly sweet. Depite the relatively low (93) proof for serious bourbon people like you and me, OF 1910 benefits from a few drops of water.

1910 is cheaper than 1920, but much harder to find in my experience. $55 may seem like a lot for a 93 proof NAS bourbon from a big distillery, but it’s well worth it in this case. It’s an excellent capstone to the Whiskey Row series. Old Forester 1910 is highly recommended.

 

Hawthorne Gamay, 2016 (review 2)

Maker: Hawthorne Vineyards, Traverse City, Michigan, USA

Place of origin: Old Mission Peninsula AVA, Michigan, USA (at least 85%)wp-1578537576438.jpg

Grape: Gamay Noir (at least 85%)

Vintage: 2016

ABV: 12.3%

Purchased for $14 (Meijer)

Appearance: Ruby

Nose: Cedar, white pepper, crushed blackberry, blueberry, pomegranate seed, jowl bacon.

Palate: Light bodied. Fruity but semi-dry. Mulberry, raspberry, table grapes, plum.

Finish: A little acid, but mostly tannin and orchard fruit. Fades quickly.

Parting words: I last reviewed this wine over a year ago in September of 2018 when it was around two years old. When I compare those notes to this one, it seems like those months have made a pretty big difference. The wine has deepened and gotten more complex with spice and oak notes getting more prominent. In Beaujolais terms, this wine is moving from out of Fleurie and toward Morgon. I still have one more bottle in my cellar which I plan to open in another year or two to see how it’s changed again!   And the older it gets, the better the price gets. 2016 Hawthorne Gamay is recomennded.

 

Père Magloire Fine VS

Maker: Père Magloire, Pont L’Eveque, Calvados, Normandy, France.wp-1576808764615.jpg

Region: Calvados AOC, France.

Age category: Fine/VS (at least 2 y/o)

ABV: 40%

Michigan State Minimum: $35

Appearance: Bright copper.

Nose: Varnish, apples.

Palate: Medium bodied. Celery, some dry apple flavor.

Finish: Dry and clean. A pinch of celery leaf.

Parting words: I’ve been exploring French apple brandies for a year or two and I figured it was about time I got around to trying something from Père Magloire, France’s (and the world’s?) best selling Calvados. I was not impressed.

This is an inoffensive but dull brandy. Light apple and celery (typical of young French or French-style apple brandies) are the only flavors detectable. Not a trace of wood, caramel, vanilla or anything else. It mixes well enough, but at $35 a bottle, you’re better off getting Laird’s Applejack or 7 1/2 y/o apple brandy if you’re looking for a light apple flavor for mixing. If you’re looking for a sipper, upgrade to the VSOP (if you can find it, it’s no longer on the Michigan list).

Père Magloire Fine VS is not recommended.

Bel Lago Pinot Noir, 2016

Maker: Bel Lago, Cedar, Michigan, USAwp-1577138116082.jpg

Place of origin: Leelanau Peninsula AVA, Leelanau County, Michigan, USA (at least 85%)

Grape: Pinot Noir (at least 85%)

Vintage: 2016

ABV: 13.3%

Purchased for $22 (Michigan by the Bottle, Royal Oak)

Appearance: Dark Burgundy.

Nose: Cedar, sauteed mushrooms, blueberries.

Palate: Cherry juice, pomegranate seeds, pinch of nutmeg

Finish: Sweet, then tart, then tannic.

Parting words: Nobody in Northern Michigan (maybe -Northern) does Pinot Noir as well as Bel Lago. This is a perfect cool climate Pinot with an elegant balance of wood, fruit, earth, and tannin wrapped together in a coat of acid. I’ve reviewed past vintages (2012 single vineyard and non-vintage, released in 2016). This isn’t in the same class as the Moreno single vineyard, but at less than half the price, I don’t think this wine is intended to be.

Still, it’s very good and well worth purchasing. 2016 Bel Lago Pinot Noir is recommended.

Domaine du Verger Brut

Maker: Val de Race Cooperative, Pleudihen sur Rance, Brittany, France20191122_102518.jpg

Place of origin: 90% Brittany, 10% Normandy

Apples: 90% bittersweet, 10% bitter

Style: Semi-dry apple cider

ABV: 5%

Purchased for $9/750 ml (Vine & Table, Carmel, Indiana)

Appearance: Light amber

Nose: Apple juice, leather, cut tart apple.

Palate: Effervescent and lightly sweet. Medium tannins, very little acid, no funk.

Finish: More tannin and a little sweetness.

Parting words: I picked this French cider up on one of my trips to Indianapolis. It’s solid, easy drinking and accessible. It has more depth than cheaper French ciders but isn’t going to knock you over with funk and tannin either. It works best as a table cider or an afternoon sipper. The price is pretty good for what it is, but I’d like it even better for a dollar or two less. Domaine du Verger Brut is recommended.

 

 

Sandhill Crane Cabernet Sauvignon, 2012

Maker: Sandhill Crane Vineyards, Jackson, Michigan, USA20191130_071255.jpg

Grape: Cabernet Sauvignon (at least 75%)

Place of origin: Michigan

Vintage: 2012

ABV: 13%

Purchased for $22 (Michigan by the Bottle Tasting Room)

Appearance: Brick red.

Nose: Toasted oak, walnut, crushed black cherries, dark chocolate.

Palate: Medium bodied. Tart and a little chewy. Balanced. Blackberry, black pepper, mushroom.

Finish: Tart, then a little tannic.

Parting words: Sandhill Crane is located in Jackson County Michigan, in the south central part of the state. While Jackson doesn’t have the lakefront and glacial features of Southwest and Northwest Michigan wine country, it does have three fine wineries, Lone Oak (in Grass Lake), Chateau Aeronautique, and Sandhill Crane.

Sandhill Crane is the biggest of the three with a wide variety of blends and varietals, including this Cabernet Sauvignon. Michigan isn’t known for this grape, but it is grown more widely than one might think. Still, it’s rare to find it bottled as a varietal here, so when it is, it’s almost always worth picking up. This wine is no exception.

No one would confuse this wine for a Napa Cab or a Left Bank Bordeaux, but it has some very nice varietal and cool climate notes with fruit, acid and tannin pleasantly balanced. It would probably hold up for another year or two at least, but this vintage is drinking very well right now, so sear yourself a steak and crack open your bottle if you have one. The 2016 and 2017 vintage should be able to age this long too if you have one of those. 2012 Sandhill Crane Cabernet Sauvignon is recommended.

 

 

 

The Glenlivet 14, Cognac Cask Selection

Maker: The Glenlivet Distillery, Moray, Scotland, UK (Pernod Ricard).20191122_101623.jpg

Region: Speyside

Style: Cognac cask finished single malt.

Age: 14 y/o

ABV: 40%

Michigan state minimum: $55 (purchased at Costco)

Appearance: Light copper.

Nose: oak, malt, sweet paprika, dried fig, dried oregano, alcohol.

Palate: Medium-bodied and lightly sweet. Oak, grape soda, apricot, vanilla.

Finish: Classic Speyside. Oak, toffee, burn.

Parting words: I don’t find myself reaching for The Glenlivet malts much (I generally find them dull) but when I saw one of this age finished in a Cognac barrel my interest was piqued. As long-time readers know, I have been exploring the world of brandy lately and I don’t like sherry so this seemed right up my alley.

It is. The Cognac finish is used judiciously adding depth without overwhelming the malt. The price isn’t terrible either. At $55 it comes in under many other comparable single malts from big producers. The Glenlivet 14 y/o Cognac Cask Selection is recommended.